Fiona Craig

Fiona Craig


In Spain, Fiona’s past architectural studies aroused her curiosity in the buildings she had encountered in her world travels. Influenced by Gaudi’s Sagrada Familiar in Barcelona she began to appreciate other European forms such as the organically featured arches of Foster's ‘Gherkin’ building in London. In Marina Bay, Singapore, she admired the colossal sky dominating buildings imitating living organisms. Fiona notes that modern architectural and engineering technologies are so magnificent they allow the imitation of organic and spiritual concepts into their structural design; an apparent harmony existing between buildings interacting with the sky as would a plant.


Email : Fiona Craig 

Website:     Fiona Craig Arte Palma 

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During Fiona’s formative years she lived in the UK. At the age of thirteen she expanded her experience of the world by traveling to Spain, Italy and Greece. After being inspired by Renaissance art and classical architecture her future studies explored these areas in more detail. In her twenties she became inspired by the French and Italian artworks of the Paris galleries. Later Fiona travelled to Australia and lived there for the majority of her life. During this period she painted and attended various drawing schools in Sydney whilst her interests in Aboriginal art developed a philosophical perspective.


Fiona worked as a teacher both in Sydney and in the Blue Mountains where she enjoyed a highlight in her career when her work included teaching children of Australian Aboriginal descent. Her attention was drawn to their readiness to respond to symbolic concepts in their art expression. She had previously studied philosophy at Sydney University and her experience progressed her understanding of cosmogenetic concepts through the art of the Indigenous Australian culture.Fiona believes that when we experience personal harmony we are more consciously discerning of the intrusive illusions, created by commercial and media industries, and we develop an awareness through our perception of nature. 


She believes that the role of the artist is more important than ever in communicating that our planet is a responding cosmogenesis or, as the ancient philosophers of Greece termed, anima mundi. Fiona paints from her apartment studio in central Palma and extends her interest in many areas of the arts, mythology and the geometric principals of nature.